Prechter Data Dictionary
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Form name Form value Form description Form question total Form frequency
Fagerstrom Test For Nicotine Dependence fagerstrom_test_for_nicotine_dependence Self-rated instrument designed to provide ordinal measure of nicotine dependence. Shown to correlate with biochemical measures of intake (r values of .25-.4). Duration: 2 minutes per administration. Heatherton TF, Kozlowski LT, Frecker RC, Fagerstrom KO. The Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence: a revision of the Fagerstrom Tolerance Questionnaire. Br J Addict. 1991;86:1119–27. Additional Notes: V2 added question 'Are you currently a smoker? No - please skip this page, Yes - Please answer the following questions:' at the top of the form. V2 used after 2/11/11; V3 changed wording in first question from "No - please skip this page" to "No - please skip this questionnaire". V3 used after 12/10/13. 6 Baseline and every 6 months with the possibility of additional collections. More Info
*Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) alcohol_use_disorders_identification_test Self-rated instrument designed as screening instrument to detect alcohol consumption that has become harmful to participant's health. Highly correlated with other self-reports of alcohol use, such as MAST (r=.88) and shown sensitivity (.84) and specificity (.71) to DSM-III alcohol use disorder. Duration: 2 minutes per administration. Saunders JB, Aasland OG, Babor TF, de la Fuente JR, Grant M. Development of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT): WHO Collaborative Project on Early Detection of Persons with Harmful Alcohol Consumption–II. Addiction. 1993;88:791–804. Additional Notes: V1 (AUDIT 12), V2 (AUDIT: Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (revised to include drugs) used after 2/1/11, V3 (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT-R)) used after 12/10/13. *Ame00021881 clarified that V1 was never used; V2 was used from the start of the study. See data dictionary notes for instructions. Need to update. V3 made only minor formatting changes, but not wording of questions on the form. 12 Baseline and every 6 months with possibility for additional collections. More Info
**Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) patient_health_questionnaire_9 Self-rated instrument assessing depression symptom criteria according to the DSM. Kroenke K, Spitzer RL, Williams JB. The PHQ-9: validity of a brief depression severity measure. J Gen Intern Med. 2001;16:606–13. Additional Notes: V2 of the PHQ updated the form from the PHQ-8 to the PHQ-9, adding the item "Thoughts that you would be better off dead or of hurting yourself in some way." V3 changed significant content in the "additional questions" asked after the 9-item questionnaire (added and removed entire questions measuring treatment adherence, productivity, service utilization, and confidence in ability to manage emotional health). *Need exact date for this change. **Currently, all responses to the "additional questions" present in the PHQ-9 form prior to 8.31.10 are not available because they do not match the same format as the current form. V4, V5, and V6 had minor formatting alterations from V3 that will not impact data. 19 Baseline and every 2 months with the possibility for additional collections. More Info
Altman Selfrating Mania Scale (ASRM) altman_selfrating_mania_scale Self-rated instrument measuring manic/hypomanic symptoms. Instrument tested during medication washout and after treatment on 22 schizophrenic, 13 schizoaffective, 36 depressed, and 34 manic patients and compared to other mania rating scales. ASRM was found to be more advantageous than other scales. Duration: 5 minutes per administration. PsychiatryAltman Biological EG, Hedeker D, Peterson JL, Davis JM. The Altman Self-Rating Mania Scale. Biol Psychiatry. 1997;42:948–55. Additional Notes: V1 (ASRM), V2 (ASRM; changed presentation/format but not wording of questions) used after 12/10/13, V3 (ASRM; changed presentation/format but not wording of questions) used after 12/16/13. 5 Baseline and every 2 months with possibility for additional collections during mood episodes or additional blood draws for biomarkers More Info
Epworth Sleepiness Scale epworth_sleepiness_scale Self-report instrument designed to assess overall level of daytime sleepiness. Duration: 2 minutes per administration. Johns, M. W. (1991). A new method for measuring daytime sleepiness: The epworth sleepiness scale. Sleep, 14(6), 540-545. doi:10.1093/sleep/14.6.540 Additional Notes: V2 removed fields for identifying information (name, date of completion, age at baseline, sex), used after 12/10/13. 8 Baseline and annually with possibility for additional collections during mood episodes or additional blood draws for biomarkers More Info
Munich Chronotype Questionnaire munich_chronotype_questionnaire Self-rated instrument assessing participant time-of-day-type. Duration: 15 minutes per administration Roenneberg T, Wirz-Justice A, Merrow M. Life between Clocks: Daily Temporal Patterns of Human Chronotypes. Journal of Biological Rhythms. 2003;18:80-90. 32 Baseline and annually with possibility for additional collections. More Info
Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index pittsburgh_sleep_quality_index Self-rated instrument developed to measure sleep quality over the past month. Patients with sleep disorders score significantly higher than healthy controls. Duration: 2 minutes per administration. Buysse DJ, Reynolds CF, Monk TH, Berman SR, Kupfer DJ. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index - A New Instrument for Psychiatric Practice and Research. Psychiatry Res. 1989;28:193–213. 10 Baseline and every 6 months with the possibility for additional collections . More Info
*Random 36 Item SF Health Survey rand_36_item_sf_health_survey Self-rated instrument consisting of two role functioning scales: role limitations due to physical health problems and role limitations due to emotional problems. Duration: 10 minutes per administration. Ware JE Jr., Sherbourne CD. The MOS 36-item short-form health survey (SF-36). I. Conceptual framework and item selection. Med Care. 1992;30:473–83. Additional Notes: V1 (SF36 Health Survey) **V2 not used. Duplicate uploaded. See Data Dictionary notes for instructions. **PS, Kritika, why is this called Random? I think it is just supposed to be RAND (RAND Health Care is a research division of the RAND Corporation) 36 Baseline and annually with the possibility of additional collections. More Info
Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) ctq Self-rated instrument assessing childhood or adolescent abuse and neglect. Good correlations between scores on the CTQ and ratings from semi-structured interviews administered by clinicians and therapists. Correlations with ratings of Sexual Abuse and Physical Abuse range from .50 to .75. Duration: 2 minutes. Bernstein DP, Fink L, Handelsman L, et al. Initial reliability and validity of a new retrospective measure of child abuse and neglect. American Journal of Psychiatry. 1994;151:1132-1136. Additional Notes: V1 (CTQ) added to study measures 5/9/06; V2 (CTQ) changed presentation/format but not wording of questions, used after 12/10/13; 28 Approximately 1 (administered at baseline with the possibility of additional collections). More Info
Life Events Occurrence Survey life_events_occurrence_survey Self-rated instrument assessing life events and their impact on daily living. Duration: 5-10 minutes. McKee SA, Kochetkova A, Maciejewski P, O’Malley S, Krishnan-Sarin S, Mazur CM., editors. A new measure for assessing the impact of stressful events on smoking behavior. Annual Meeting of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco; 2005. Prague. 35 Baseline and annually with possibility for additional collections. More Info
*Family Adaptability And Cohesion Evaluation Scale (FACES II) family_adaptability_and_cohesion_evaluation_scale Self-rated instrument assessing adaptability and cohesion of the participant's family unit. Duration: 2 minutes per administration. Olson DH, Portner J, and Bell R. (1982). Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scales. In DH Olson, I. McCubbin, HS Barnes, A. Larson. St. Paul: University of Minn., Department of Family and Social Science. Additional Notes: V1 (FACES II) added to study measures 5/9/06; V2 changed presentation/format but not wording of questions, used after 12/10/13 *Come back to wording of different versions after talking to Holli. 30 Baseline and annually with the possibility of additional collections. More Info
Measures Related To Close Interpersonal Relationship measures_related_to_close_interpersonal_relationsh Self-rated instrument assessing level of received social support and social undermining. Duration: 2 minutes per administration. Vinokur AD, Price RH, Caplan RD. Hard Times and Hurtful Partners: How Financial Strain Affects Depression and Relationship Satisfaction of Unemployed Persons and Their Spouses. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 1996;71:166-179. 17 Baseline and annually with possibility for additional collections. More Info
Life Events Checklist life_events_checklist Self-rated instrument developed to assess exposure to potentially traumatic events. Duration: 2 minutes per administration. Developed at the National Center for PTSD concurrently with the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS). Gray MJ, Litz BT, Hsu JL, Lombardo TW. Psychometric Properties of the Life Events Checklist. Assessment. 2004;11:330-341. 17 Baseline and annually with possibility for additional collections. More Info
*Life Functioning Questionnaire (LFQ) life_functioning_questionnaire Self-rated instrument assessing level of difficulty in life functioning. Duration: 10-15 minutes. Altshuler L, Mintz J, Leight K. The Life Functioning Questionnaire (LFQ): a brief, gender-neutral scale assessing functional outcome. Psychiatry Research. 2002;112:161-182. Additional Notes: V1 (LFQ) added to study measures 6/9/10; V2 (LFQ) had a minor change to format but not wording of questions, used after 12/10/13 *Come back to change wording after talking to Holli. 21 Baseline and every 2 months with possibility for additional collections. More Info
*Barratt-Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11) barratt_impulsiveness_scale Self-rated instrument assessing impulsiveness. The total score of the BIS-11 is an internally consistent measure of impulsiveness and has clinical utility for measuring impulsiveness among patients. Duration: 10-15 minutes Patton JH, Stanford MS, Barratt ES. Factor structure of the Barratt impulsiveness scale. Journal of clinical psychology. 1995;51:768. Additional Notes: V1 (BIS-11 English Version) added to study measures 9/30/09, approved by IRB 12/15/09. Implemented 9/7/10. V2 (BIS-11 English Version) changed presentation/format but not wording of questions, used after 6/11/10; V3 (BIS-11 English Version) is exactly the same document as V2, uploaded/used after 12/10/13; V4 (BIS-11) changed presentation/format but not wording of questions, used after 12/10/13. *V1-V4 of the BIS-11 are consistent in content and wording of instructions and questions. The versions vary only in presentation/format (e.g. adding a line separating the question stem and the responses, bubbles vs. check boxes to indicate response). 30 Approximately 1 (administered at baseline with the possibility of additional collections). More Info
*Brown Goodwin Aggression History brown_goodwin_aggression_history Self-rated instrument assessing participant history of aggression. Duration: 10-15 minutes Brown, G. L., Goodwin, F. K., Ballenger, J. C., Goyer, P. F., & Major, L. F. (1979). Aggression in humans correlates with cerebrospinal fluid amine metabolites. Psychiatry Research, 1(2), 131-139. doi:10.1016/0165-1781(79)90053-2 Additional Notes: V1 (Aggression History) added to study measures 6/9/10; V2 (Aggression History) changed presentation/format but not wording of questions, used after 12/10/13. *come back to change the wording for versions after talking to Holli. 11 Approximately 1 (administered at baseline with the possibility of additional collections). More Info
**Buss-Durkee Hostility Inventory (BDI) boss_durkee_inventory Self-rated inventory assessing the various aspects of hostility. Duration: 10-15 minutes. Buss, A. H., & Durkee, A. (1957). An inventory for assessing different kinds of hostility. Journal of Consulting Psychology, 21(4), 343-349. doi:10.1037/h0046900 Additional Notes: V1 (Buss Durkee Inventory 1957) added to study measures 6/9/10; V2 (Buss Durkee Inventory (BDI)) changed presentation/format but not wording of questions, used after 12/10/13; V3 (Buss Durkee Inventory (BDI)) only change was a small format alteration, used after 12/16/13 *Kritika just needs to correct the form value where this is being pulled from to reflect accurate spelling of the measure. Kritika and Brianna have already discussed this. 75 Approximately 1 (administered at baseline with the possibility of additional collections). More Info
Working Alliance Inventory working_alliance_inventory The Working Alliance Inventory - Short Form (WAI-C) is a self-rated instrument asking the participant to report their thoughts and feelings about their treatment provider. Duration: 2 minutes per administration. Tracey TJ, Kokotovic AM. Factor Structure of the Working Alliance Inventory. Psychological Assessment: A Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. 1989;1:207-210. Additional Notes: V1 (The Working Alliance Inventory - Short Form (C)) added to study measures 1/31/11; V2 (The Working Alliance Inventory - Short Form (WAI-C)) minor change in format of questions, but no change in content of questions. Changes likely would not impact participant responses, used after 12/10/13. 12 Approximately 1 (administered at baseline with the possibility of additional collections). More Info
Experiences In Close Relationships Questionnaire - Partner experiences_in_close_relationships_questionnairepa Self-rated instrument designed to assess emotional experiences in intimate relationships. Duration: 5 minutes Fraley RC, Waller NG, Brennan KA. An Item Response Theory Analysis of Self-Report Measures of Adult Attachment. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 2000;78:350-365. Additional Notes: V1 (ERC - Partner Questionnaire) added to study measures 1/31/11; V2 (ERC - Partner Questionnaire) minor changes in format, used after 12/10/13. 36 Approximately 1 (administered at baseline with the possibility of additional collections). More Info
Experiences In Close Relationships Questionnaire - Mother experiences_in_close_relationships_questionnairemo Self-rated instrument designed to assess experiences in relationship with mother or mother-figure. Duration: 5 minutes Revised from ECR-P: Fraley RC, Waller NG, Brennan KA. An Item Response Theory Analysis of Self-Report Measures of Adult Attachment. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 2000;78:350-365. Additional Notes: V1 (ERC - Mother Questionnaire) added to study measures 1/31/11; V2 (ERC - Mother Questionnaire) changes in format and minor alterations in instructions. Changes likely would not impact participant responses, used after 12/10/13. 36 Approximately 1 (administered at baseline with the possibility of additional collections). More Info
Experiences In Close Relationships Questionnaire - Father experiences_in_close_relationships_questionnairefa Self-rated instrument designed to assess experiences in relationship with father or father-figure. Duration: 5 minutes Revised from ECR-P: Fraley RC, Waller NG, Brennan KA. An Item Response Theory Analysis of Self-Report Measures of Adult Attachment. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 2000;78:350-365. Additional Notes: V1 (ERC - Father Questionnaire) added to study measures 1/31/11; V2 (ERC - Father Questionnaire) changes in format and minor alterations in instructions. Changes likely would not impact participant responses, used after 12/10/13. 36 Approximately 1 (administered at baseline with the possibility of additional collections). More Info
Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire seasonal_pattern_assessment_questionnaire Self-rated instrument assessing how participant mood and behavior change over time. Duration: 5 minutes. Rosenthal NE, Bradt GH, Wehr TA. Seasonal pattern assessment questionnaire. National Institute of Mental Health: Bethesda; 1987. 12 Approximately 1 (administered at baseline with the possibility of additional collections). More Info
Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7) generalized_anxiety_disorder_scale Self-rated instrument designed to assess criteria for Generalized Anxiety Disorder according to the DSM. Duration: 5 minutes per administration. Spitzer RL, Kroenke K, Williams JBW, Lowe B. A brief measure for assessing generalized anxiety disorder: the GAD-7. Arch Intern Med. 2006;166:1092. 8 Baseline and every 2 months with possibility for additional collections. More Info
*SF 12 Health Survey sf_12_health_survey Self-rated instrument consisting of two role functioning scales: role limitations due to physical health problems and role limitations due to emotional problems. Duration: 5 minutes per administration. Ware J Jr., Kosinski M, Keller SD. A 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey: construction of scales and preliminary tests of reliability and validity. Med Care. 1996;34:220–33. Additional Notes: V1 (SF36 Health Survey) **V2 not used. Duplicate uploaded. See Data Dictionary notes for instructions. 12 Administered 2 months after Baseline and every two months excluding the 12-month intervals (e.g. 12-month, 24-month, 36-month). This form complements the SF-36 Health Survey which is administered at Baseline and annually at 12-month intervals. More Info
NEO neo Self-rated instrument developed to measure the 5 factors of personality. Duration: 35-40 minutes. Costa PT Jr., McCrae RR. Personality in adulthood: a six-year longitudinal study of self-reports and spouse ratings on the NEO Personality Inventory. J Pers Soc Psychol. 1988;54:853–63. 240 Baseline and flexibly 5 years and 10 years after baseline. More Info
Young Mania Rating Scale ymrs Clinician-rated instrument designed to measure the severity of manic symptoms and the effect of treatment on mania severity. Validity was evaluated by comparing it to Petterson Mania Scale and Beigel Mania Rating Scale. Correlations were .89 and .71, respectively. Duration: 5-10 minutes per administration. Young R, Biggs J, Ziegler V, Meyer D. A rating scale for mania: reliability, validity and sensitivity. The British Journal of Psychiatry. 1978;133:429-435. Additional Notes: V1 (YMRS), V2 (YMRS; changed presentation/format but not wording of questions) used after 1/3/12. 11 Baseline and approximately every 2 years (administered at annual follow-up assessments) with the possibility of additional collections. More Info
*Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) hamd Clinician-rated instrument designed to measure the severity of depressive symptoms in patients with primary depressive illness. Validity has been evaluated by several groups; correlates with global measures of depressive severity range from .65 to .9. Duration: 15-20 minutes per administration. Hamilton M (1960) A rating scale for depression. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 23:56–62 Origin of SIGH-D: Williams JBW: A structured interview guide for the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Archives of General Psychiatry 45:742-747, 1988). Additional Notes: V2 (HAM-D) *** changes in format and minor alterations in instructions. Changes likely would not impact participant responses, used after 12/10/13 29 The unstructured version (HAM-D) administered at baseline and approximately every 2 years (at even year annual follow-up assessments). This measure is administered to complement the DIGS interview (at baseline) and the LIFE (approximately every 2 years at even year follow-up assessments). In the case of a missed annual assessment where a LIFE appointment was missed, the HAM-D may be completed in place of the SIGH-D in an odd year of annual follow-up. The structured version(SIGH-D) is administered on alternate years* (every 2 years at odd year annual follow-up assessments). * Prior to 20**, the SIGH-D was not administered at years 1 and 5. More Info
*Structured Interview Guide For Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (SIGH-D) sighd Instrument designed to measure the severity of depressive symptoms in patients with primary depressive illness. Structured version of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale; administered by trained non-clinicians. Duration: 15-20 minutes per administration. Hamilton M (1960) A rating scale for depression. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 23:56–62 Origin of SIGH-D: Williams JBW: A structured interview guide for the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Archives of General Psychiatry 45:742-747, 1988). Additional Notes: The SIGH-D was added to study measures 6/11/10. 29 The unstructured version (HAM-D) administered at baseline and approximately every 2 years (at even year annual follow-up assessments). This measure is administered to complement the DIGS interview (at baseline) and the LIFE (approximately every 2 years at even year follow-up assessments). In the case of a missed annual assessment where a LIFE appointment was missed, the HAM-D may be completed in place of the SIGH-D in an odd year of annual follow-up. The structured version(SIGH-D) is administered on alternate years* (every 2 years at odd year annual follow-up assessments). * Prior to 20**, the SIGH-D was not administered at years 1 and 5. More Info
Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale (C-SSRS) Baseline/Screening Version cssrs_baseline Clinician-rated scale assessing suicidality in the past month and ever in the participant's history. Duration: 15-20 minutes. Posner K, Oquendo MA, Gould M, Stanley B, Davies M. Columbia Classification Algorithm of Suicide Assessment (C-CASA): classification of suicidal events in the FDA's pediatric suicidal risk analysis of antidepressants. Am J Psychiatry 2007 July;164(7):1035-43. The C-SSRS Baseline was added to study measures 1/3/12. 28 The C-SSRS Baseline is measured approximately once (at baseline) with the possibility for additional collections. The C-SSRS Since Last Visit is then measured approximately every 2 years (at even year annual follow-up assessments) to complement the LIFE. More Info
Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale (C-SSRS) Since Last Visit cssrs_v2 Clinician-rated scale assessing suicidality in the past 2 years (within the interval). Duration: 15-20 minutes per administration. Posner K, Brown GK, Stanley B., et al.The Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale: initial validity and internal consistency findings from three multisite studies with adolescents and adults. Am J Psychiatry. 2011;168:1266–77. Additional Notes: The C-SSRS Since Last Visit was added to study measures 1/3/12. 28 The C-SSRS Baseline is measured approximately once (at baseline) with the possibility for additional collections. The C-SSRS Since Last Visit is then measured approximately every 2 years (at even year annual follow-up assessments) to complement the LIFE. More Info
*Brief Social Phobia Scale (BSPS) bsps Clinician-rated instrument designed to assess the characteristic symptoms of social phobia, using three subscales – fear, avoidance, and physiological arousal. The BSPS assesses severity and treatment response in social phobia as defined by DSM criteria. Internal consistency: Cronbach's alpha of .81. Large correlations with other measures of social anxiety and phobias, such as Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (r=.70). Duration: 10-15 minutes per administration. DAVIDSON, J. R. T., MINER, C. M., DE VEAUGH-GEISS, J., TUPLER, L. A., COLKET, J. T., & POTTS, N. L. S. (1997). The brief social phobia scale: A psychometric evaluation. Psychological Medicine, 27(1), 161-166. doi:10.1017/S0033291796004217 Additional Notes: *According to eResearch this measure has been used since the beginning of the study. There is no tracking (in the IRB application) for the years it was not in use. It was decided in the data dictionary meeting that Kritika would pull a data query to determine the dates the BSPS was not in use. 11 Administered at baseline and approximately every 2 years (at even year annual follow-up assessments). This measure is administered to complement the DIGS interview (at baseline) and the LIFE (approximately every 2 years at even year follow-up assessments). More Info
Demographics - Baseline (DIGS) demographics One section of the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS), a clinician-rated instrument recording information regarding the participant's functioning and psychopathology with primary emphasis on information relevant to the study of affective disorders and schizophrenia. The organization of the interview and the item coverage are designed to elicit information necessary for making diagnoses based on multiple diagnostic criteria. This section was designed to obtain basic demographic information. Collects the following: sex, age at baseline, adoption status, country of origin, ethnic background of parents, childhood religious affiliation, marital status at baseline, number of children at baseline, living arrangements, occupation, years of schooling, Military history. Nurnberger JI Jr., Blehar MC, Kaufmann CA., et al.Diagnostic interview for genetic studies. Rationale, unique features, and training. NIMH Genetics Initiative. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1994;51:849–59. 13 Approximately 1 (administered at baseline with the possibility of additional collections, e.g., in the case of a period of 3+ years without participant contact a DIGS Review may be completed). More Info
Medical History - Baseline (DIGS) medical_history One section of the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS), a clinician-rated instrument recording information regarding the participant's functioning and psychopathology with primary emphasis on information relevant to the study of affective disorders and schizophrenia. The organization of the interview and the item coverage are designed to elicit information necessary for making diagnoses based on multiple diagnostic criteria. This section assesses whether the participant has had any physical illness or injury. Collects the following: presence of medical condition(s), impact on conditions of daily living, height and maximum lifetime weight, history of medical tests, current medications*, abnormal birth, history of pregnancies, mood changes during menstrual cycle, menopause. *Current medication is infrequently entered here because it is preferable that medication be entered in another location. See Physical Forms for the baseline appointment for this information. Nurnberger JI Jr., Blehar MC, Kaufmann CA., et al.Diagnostic interview for genetic studies. Rationale, unique features, and training. NIMH Genetics Initiative. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1994;51:849–59. 10 Approximately 1 (administered at baseline with the possibility of additional collections, e.g., in the case of a period of 3+ years without participant contact a DIGS Review may be completed). More Info
Modified Minimental Status Examination - Baseline (DIGS) modified_minimental_status_examination One section of the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS), a clinician-rated instrument recording information regarding the participant's functioning and psychopathology with primary emphasis on information relevant to the study of affective disorders and schizophrenia. The organization of the interview and the item coverage are designed to elicit information necessary for making diagnoses based on multiple diagnostic criteria. This examination is to be used when the participant is disoriented, confused, cannot give coherent answers, or appears to have substantial memory deficit. Collects the following information to assess mental status: orientation, registration, attention and calculation, recall, language, cognitive state, level of consciousness. Adapted, with permission, from Folstein, M.F., Folstein, S.E., McHugh, P., "Mini Mental State: A practical method for grading the cognitive state of patients for the clinician", Journal of Psychiatric Research 12:189-198, 1975. Nurnberger JI Jr., Blehar MC, Kaufmann CA., et al.Diagnostic interview for genetic studies. Rationale, unique features, and training. NIMH Genetics Initiative. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1994;51:849–59. Additional Notes: Mental status is routinely assessed during the pre-screening process. It would be uncommon for a participant to pass through the mental status exam completed during the pre-screen and then need to complete the Modified Minimental Status Examination during the baseline visit. Investigators estimate less than ten records with this form completed. 9 Approximately 1 (administered at baseline with the possibility of additional collections, e.g., in the case of a period of 3+ years without participant contact a DIGS Review may be completed). More Info
Telephone Interview For Cognitive Status - Baseline (DIGS) telephone_interview_for_cognitive_status One section of the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS), a clinician-rated instrument recording information regarding the participant's functioning and psychopathology with primary emphasis on information relevant to the study of affective disorders and schizophrenia. The organization of the interview and the item coverage are designed to elicit information necessary for making diagnoses based on multiple diagnostic criteria. The Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status is used as a replacement for the Modified Mini-Mental Status Examination if the Baseline DIGS is completed via phone. Prior to 2019, it was mandatory for participation in the study that the DIGS take place in person. There should be less than five or no records of this form being completed prior to 2019. Adapted, with permission, from Brandt J, Spencer M, Folstein M, "The Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status", Neuropsychiatry, Neuropsychology and Behavioral Neurology, Vol 1, No. 2, pp. 111-117, 1988. Nurnberger JI Jr., Blehar MC, Kaufmann CA., et al.Diagnostic interview for genetic studies. Rationale, unique features, and training. NIMH Genetics Initiative. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1994;51:849–59. 12 Approximately 1 (administered at baseline with the possibility of additional collections, e.g., in the case of a period of 3+ years without participant contact a DIGS Review may be completed). More Info
Somatization - Baseline (DIGS) somatization One section of the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS), a clinician-rated instrument recording information regarding the participant's functioning and psychopathology with primary emphasis on information relevant to the study of affective disorders and schizophrenia. The organization of the interview and the item coverage are designed to elicit information necessary for making diagnoses based on multiple diagnostic criteria. This section provides diagnostic criteria for somatization disorder using DSM-III-R and DSM-IV. Collects the following to assess impairment related to somatization: extent of physical health problems/medical problems, missing obligations due to headaches, symptoms of neurological problems. Skip outs: Because the diagnosis of somatization disorder can require many questions, a branching procedure with appropriate skip outs has been included. 1a. and 1b. are screening questions (assessing inclusion criteria for somatization disorder). Nurnberger JI Jr., Blehar MC, Kaufmann CA., et al.Diagnostic interview for genetic studies. Rationale, unique features, and training. NIMH Genetics Initiative. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1994;51:849–59. Varies by response. Approximately 1 (administered at baseline with the possibility of additional collections, e.g., in the case of a period of 3+ years without participant contact a DIGS Review may be completed). More Info
Overview Of Psychiatric Disturbance - Baseline (DIGS) overview_of_psychiatric_disturbance One section of the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS), a clinician-rated instrument recording information regarding the participant's functioning and psychopathology with primary emphasis on information relevant to the study of affective disorders and schizophrenia. The organization of the interview and the item coverage are designed to elicit information necessary for making diagnoses based on multiple diagnostic criteria. The overview is an open-ended history of emotional problems that the participant acknowledges. The overview is important in providing information about a participant's premorbid level of functioning. This section will vary in length; for most participants with pathology, it should take between 10-20 minutes to complete. Collects the following to assess psychiatric disturbance: history of emotional problems, treatment for emotional problems, impairment due to emotional problems, hospitalizations for emotional problems, history of electro-convulsive treatment, history of medications for emotional problems or mental health, others' assessment of participant's need for professional help, open-ended response for discussion of these periods of time. Skip outs: Questions 1-6 are a potential skip point to question 8; question 7 is a potential skip-point to the next section. Nurnberger JI Jr., Blehar MC, Kaufmann CA., et al.Diagnostic interview for genetic studies. Rationale, unique features, and training. NIMH Genetics Initiative. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1994;51:849–59. Varies by response. Approximately 1 (administered at baseline with the possibility of additional collections, e.g., in the case of a period of 3+ years without participant contact a DIGS Review may be completed). More Info
Major Depression - Baseline (DIGS) major_depression One section of the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS), a clinician-rated instrument recording information regarding the participant's functioning and psychopathology with primary emphasis on information relevant to the study of affective disorders and schizophrenia. The organization of the interview and the item coverage are designed to elicit information necessary for making diagnoses based on multiple diagnostic criteria. This section provides diagnostic criteria for major depression using DSM-III-R, DSM-III, RDC, RDC modified (Gershon), ICD-10, and DSM-IV. Collects the following to assess Major Depression in the one or two most severe episodes: diagnostic criteria for MDE, diurnal variation of depression, presence of psychotic features in or outside MDE, impairment in activities of daily living and relationships (role dysfunction), presence of co-morbid pregnancy, physical illness, change in medication, drug/alcohol use. Skip outs: Questions 1 and 2 are screening questions assessing inclusion criteria for most severe episode of major depression (if both Q1 and Q2 are 0 skip to next section); after question 17 is a potential skip-point to next section; question 38 is a screening question assessing inclusion criteria for second most severe episode of major depression and is a potential skip-point to question 71; question 50 is a potential skip-point to question 71. Nurnberger JI Jr., Blehar MC, Kaufmann CA., et al.Diagnostic interview for genetic studies. Rationale, unique features, and training. NIMH Genetics Initiative. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1994;51:849–59. Varies by response. Approximately 1 (administered at baseline with the possibility of additional collections, e.g., in the case of a period of 3+ years without participant contact a DIGS Review may be completed). More Info
Mania/Hypomania - Baseline (DIGS) maniahypomania One section of the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS), a clinician-rated instrument recording information regarding the participant's functioning and psychopathology with primary emphasis on information relevant to the study of affective disorders and schizophrenia. The organization of the interview and the item coverage are designed to elicit information necessary for making diagnoses based on multiple diagnostic criteria. This section elicits clinical data needed for the diagnostic criteria for mania and hypomania using DSM-IV, DSM-III-R, RDC, modified RDC. The purpose of this section is to determine if the participant has ever had a manic or hypomanic episode, and if so, to document up to 2 such episodes in detail. Collects the following to assess Mania/Hypomania in each the "Most Severe Episode" and an "Other Episode": diagnostic criteria for Mania, diurnal variation of depression, presence of psychotic features in or outside of mania, history of hospitalizations during mania, impairment in activities of daily living and relationships, rule out questions for co-morbid physical illness, change in medication, shortly after beginning antidepressant medication or course of ECT, drug/alcohol use, assessment of mixed depressive symptoms during mania. Skip outs: Questions 1a. -1f. are screening questions (assessing inclusion criteria for most severe episode of mania/hypomania); question 13 is a potential skip-point to next section; question 32 is a screening question (assessing inclusion criteria for second most severe episode of mania/hypomania) and a potential skip-point to question 60; question 41 is a potential skip-point to question 60. Nurnberger JI Jr., Blehar MC, Kaufmann CA., et al.Diagnostic interview for genetic studies. Rationale, unique features, and training. NIMH Genetics Initiative. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1994;51:849–59. Varies by response. Approximately 1 (administered at baseline with the possibility of additional collections, e.g., in the case of a period of 3+ years without participant contact a DIGS Review may be completed). More Info
Alcohol Abuse And Dependence - Baseline (DIGS) alcohol_abuse_and_dependence One section of the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS), a clinician-rated instrument recording information regarding the participant's functioning and psychopathology with primary emphasis on information relevant to the study of affective disorders and schizophrenia. The organization of the interview and the item coverage are designed to elicit information necessary for making diagnoses based on multiple diagnostic criteria. This section assesses both alcohol consumption and diagnostic criteria for alcohol abuse and dependence using Feighner, DSM-III-R, and DSM-IV. Two additional questions are included to address ICD-10 criteria. Collects the following: psychological and physical problems related to alcohol consumption and withdrawal related to alcohol consumption. Skip outs: There are four separate skip-outs for this section. Question 1 (if the participant has never had a full drink of alcohol); Question 2 AND 3 (if the participant never drank regularly AND never got drunk); Question 4 (if the participant never had more than 3 drinks in a 24-hour period); and question 10. Nurnberger JI Jr., Blehar MC, Kaufmann CA., et al.Diagnostic interview for genetic studies. Rationale, unique features, and training. NIMH Genetics Initiative. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1994;51:849–59. Varies by response. Approximately 1 (administered at baseline with the possibility of additional collections, e.g., in the case of a period of 3+ years without participant contact a DIGS Review may be completed). More Info
Tobacco Marijuana And Other Drug Abuse And Dependence - Baseline (DIGS) tobacco_marijuana_and_other_drug_abuse_and_dependence One section of the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS), a clinician-rated instrument recording information regarding the participant's functioning and psychopathology with primary emphasis on information relevant to the study of affective disorders and schizophrenia. The organization of the interview and the item coverage are designed to elicit information necessary for making diagnoses based on multiple diagnostic criteria. The tobacco section (question 1 - question 16) assesses DSM-IV Nicotine Dependence for cigarette smokers. The marijuana section (question 17 - question 33) and other drugs section (question 34 - question 53) provide diagnostic criteria for drug abuse and dependence using DSM-IV and DSM-III-R. The interview also includes several questions to determine the presence of "high risk behavior". Tabacco skip outs: There are 4 separate skip-outs for this section. Question 1, question 2b., after question 8, and after question 15 all of which instruct to skip to question 17 (the start of the marijuana section). Marijuana skip outs: Questions 17, 17a, 23, and after 32 are all potential skip-points which instruct to skip to question 34 (the start of the other drugs section). Other drugs skip outs: If question 34c is less than 11, skip to the next section; question 40 is a potential skip-point to question 53; potential skip-point to question 53 after question 50. Nurnberger JI Jr., Blehar MC, Kaufmann CA., et al.Diagnostic interview for genetic studies. Rationale, unique features, and training. NIMH Genetics Initiative. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1994;51:849–59. Varies by response. Approximately 1 (administered at baseline with the possibility of additional collections, e.g., in the case of a period of 3+ years without participant contact a DIGS Review may be completed). More Info
Psychosis - Baseline (DIGS) psychosis One section of the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS), a clinician-rated instrument recording information regarding the participant's functioning and psychopathology with primary emphasis on information relevant to the study of affective disorders and schizophrenia. The organization of the interview and the item coverage are designed to elicit information necessary for making diagnoses based on multiple diagnostic criteria. The section provides diagnostic criteria for psychosis using DSM-III, DSM-III-R, RDC, Modified RDC (Gershon), DSM-IV, ICD-10, and records symptoms for the OPCRIT 3.0 program. Skip outs: Questions 1a - 1e and question 1i are screening questions (assessing inclusion criteria for psychosis); after question 4 is a potential skip-point to question 22; after question 21 is a potential skip-point to question 32; question 32 is a potential skip-point to question 34; question 34 is a potential skip-point to the next section; question 48 is a potential skip-point to question 58; question 49 is a potential skip-point to question 52; after question 51 is a potential skip-point to question 58; question 58 is a potential skip-point to question 68; question 59 is a potential skip-point to question 62; after question 61 is a potential skip-point to question 68. Nurnberger JI Jr., Blehar MC, Kaufmann CA., et al.Diagnostic interview for genetic studies. Rationale, unique features, and training. NIMH Genetics Initiative. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1994;51:849–59. Varies by response. Approximately 1 (administered at baseline with the possibility of additional collections, e.g., in the case of a period of 3+ years without participant contact a DIGS Review may be completed). More Info
*Comorbidity Assessment - Baseline (DIGS) commorbidity_assessment One section of the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS), a clinician-rated instrument recording information regarding the participant's functioning and psychopathology with primary emphasis on information relevant to the study of affective disorders and schizophrenia. The organization of the interview and the item coverage are designed to elicit information necessary for making diagnoses based on multiple diagnostic criteria. It is difficult to determine the temporal relationship between substance abuse and other psychiatric disorders before those disorders are clearly defined by the interviewer and participant. This section was designed to avoid this problem by referring back to those sections after they have been completed. It asks about which disorder started first, then about the temporal relationship between substance use and psychiatric symptoms in various episodes. Participants who have a significant history of alcohol, marijuana, or other drug abuse AND evidence of depression, mania, hypomania, dsythymia, or psychosis are asked this section. *also, is this too much information? *do we ask this section typically or is it a site optional?? Ask an interviewer for this information. Nurnberger JI Jr., Blehar MC, Kaufmann CA., et al.Diagnostic interview for genetic studies. Rationale, unique features, and training. NIMH Genetics Initiative. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1994;51:849–59. Varies by response. Approximately 1 (administered at baseline with the possibility of additional collections, e.g., in the case of a period of 3+ years without participant contact a DIGS Review may be completed). More Info
*Suicidal Behavior - Baseline (DIGS) suicidal_behavior One section of the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS), a clinician-rated instrument recording information regarding the participant's functioning and psychopathology with primary emphasis on information relevant to the study of affective disorders and schizophrenia. The organization of the interview and the item coverage are designed to elicit information necessary for making diagnoses based on multiple diagnostic criteria. A nondiagnostic section that assesses the frequency and form of suicidal behavior. Collects the following information: number of attempts, treatment following most serious attempt, intent of most serious attempt, lethality of most serious attempt, premeditation of most serious attempt, violent behavior towards others, and self-harm without suicidal intent. *Holli, is this section typically completed or is it site optional for us? An old DIGS had it completed and a new DIGS did not. Could ask Kritika to pull a query for this information? Skip outs: Question 1 is a screening question (if the participant states that they never attempted suicide, the rest of the section is skipped); question 1a is a potential skip-point to question 2; question 13 is a potential skip-point to question 15; question 15 is a potential skip-point to the next section. Nurnberger JI Jr., Blehar MC, Kaufmann CA., et al.Diagnostic interview for genetic studies. Rationale, unique features, and training. NIMH Genetics Initiative. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1994;51:849–59. Varies by response. Approximately 1 (administered at baseline with the possibility of additional collections, e.g., in the case of a period of 3+ years without participant contact a DIGS Review may be completed). More Info
Anxiety Disorder - Baseline (DIGS) anxiety_disorder One section of the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS), a clinician-rated instrument recording information regarding the participant's functioning and psychopathology with primary emphasis on information relevant to the study of affective disorders and schizophrenia. The organization of the interview and the item coverage are designed to elicit information necessary for making diagnoses based on multiple diagnostic criteria. This section provides diagnostic criteria for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), phobia disorders, and panic disorder using DSM-IV, DSM-III-R, RDC, and modified RDC (Gershon). Collects the following information: presence of obsessions and compulsions and the extent to which they are distressing, time-consuming, and interfere with the participant's normal routine, occupational functioning, or usual social activities or relationships with others. Skip outs: Questions 1 and 2 are screening questions for obsessions and compulsions (ratings on 1 and 2 are potential skip-points to question 4, if only 0 to Q2, or question 11 if 0 to both Q1 and Q2); question 11 is a potential skip-point to question 28; question 15 is a potential skip-point to question 28; question 28c is a potential skip-point to the next section; question 29c is a potential skip-point to the next section. Nurnberger JI Jr., Blehar MC, Kaufmann CA., et al.Diagnostic interview for genetic studies. Rationale, unique features, and training. NIMH Genetics Initiative. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1994;51:849–59. Varies by response. Approximately 1 (administered at baseline with the possibility of additional collections, e.g., in the case of a period of 3+ years without participant contact a DIGS Review may be completed). More Info
*Post Traumatic Stress Disorder - Baseline (DIGS) post_traumatic_stress_disorder One section of the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS), a clinician-rated instrument recording information regarding the participant's functioning and psychopathology with primary emphasis on information relevant to the study of affective disorders and schizophrenia. The organization of the interview and the item coverage are designed to elicit information necessary for making diagnoses based on multiple diagnostic criteria. This section is site optional and was implemented into the study in **MONTH AND YEAR. Need to ask Kritika, or maybe Holli or Kelly? Section was designed to assess Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) according to DSM-IV. Reviews all diagnostic criteria for a PTSD diagnosis. Skip outs: Question 1 is a screening question (assesses presence of traumatic event); question 2 is a potential skip-point to next section; questions 3-5 (if all 0) are a potential skip-point to the next section; after question 11 is a potential skip-point (if less than 3 of questions 6-11 are endorsed) to the next section; Nurnberger JI Jr., Blehar MC, Kaufmann CA., et al.Diagnostic interview for genetic studies. Rationale, unique features, and training. NIMH Genetics Initiative. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1994;51:849–59. Varies by response. Approximately 1 (administered at baseline with the possibility of additional collections, e.g., in the case of a period of 3+ years without participant contact a DIGS Review may be completed). More Info
Eating Disorder - Baseline (DIGS) eating_disorder One section of the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS), a clinician-rated instrument recording information regarding the participant's functioning and psychopathology with primary emphasis on information relevant to the study of affective disorders and schizophrenia. The organization of the interview and the item coverage are designed to elicit information necessary for making diagnoses based on multiple diagnostic criteria. This section provides diagnostic criteria for Anorexia Nervosa and/or Bulimia using DSM-III-R and DSM-IV. The eating disorder section is divided into two parts: Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia. Skip outs: Two screening questions are asked in the Anorexia section (questions 1 and 2), and if the participant answers no to both questions, they skip to the Bulimia section (starts at question 14) because a diagnosis of Anorexia is not possible. Question 6a is a potential skip-point to question 14; question 14 is a screening question (assessing inclusion criteria for Bulimia); question 16 is a potential skip-point to question 19; questions 19a-19f are a potential skip-point to question 20; question 21 is a potential skip-point to the next section; question 22 is a potential skip-point to the next section. Nurnberger JI Jr., Blehar MC, Kaufmann CA., et al.Diagnostic interview for genetic studies. Rationale, unique features, and training. NIMH Genetics Initiative. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1994;51:849–59. Varies by response. Approximately 1 (administered at baseline with the possibility of additional collections, e.g., in the case of a period of 3+ years without participant contact a DIGS Review may be completed). More Info
Pathological Gambling - Baseline (DIGS) pathological_gambling One section of the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS), a clinician-rated instrument recording information regarding the participant's functioning and psychopathology with primary emphasis on information relevant to the study of affective disorders and schizophrenia. The organization of the interview and the item coverage are designed to elicit information necessary for making diagnoses based on multiple diagnostic criteria. This section provides diagnostic criteria for pathological gambling using DSM-III-R, and DSM-IV. Collects the following information: history of regular participation and preoccupation with gambling, failure(s) to resist impulses to gamble, and the degree to which the gambling disrupts or damages social, occupational, or recreational pursuits. Skip outs: Question 1 is a screening question (asks if the participant has ever gambled or bet too often or too much); after question 15a is a potential skip-point to the next section. Nurnberger JI Jr., Blehar MC, Kaufmann CA., et al.Diagnostic interview for genetic studies. Rationale, unique features, and training. NIMH Genetics Initiative. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1994;51:849–59. Varies by response. Approximately 1 (administered at baseline with the possibility of additional collections, e.g., in the case of a period of 3+ years without participant contact a DIGS Review may be completed). More Info
Antisocial Personality - Baseline (DIGS) antisocial_personality One section of the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS), a clinician-rated instrument recording information regarding the participant's functioning and psychopathology with primary emphasis on information relevant to the study of affective disorders and schizophrenia. The organization of the interview and the item coverage are designed to elicit information necessary for making diagnoses based on multiple diagnostic criteria. This section provides diagnostic criteria for antisocial personality (ASP) using DSM-III-R and DSM-IV. Collects information on the following: presence of a long-lasting pattern of impulsive and irresponsible behavior, a craving for excitement and new experiences, and a consistent disregard for the rights of other people. This module also evaluates the relationship between ASP, conduct disorder, substance abuse, and mania/psychosis. Skip outs: Questions 1a-1l are a potential skip-point to question 2; question 2a is a potential skip-point to the next section; question 14 is a potential skip-point to question 16. Nurnberger JI Jr., Blehar MC, Kaufmann CA., et al.Diagnostic interview for genetic studies. Rationale, unique features, and training. NIMH Genetics Initiative. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1994;51:849–59. Varies by response. Approximately 1 (administered at baseline with the possibility of additional collections, e.g., in the case of a period of 3+ years without participant contact a DIGS Review may be completed). More Info
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder - Baseline (DIGS) attention_deficit_hyperactivity_disorder One section of the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS), a clinician-rated instrument recording information regarding the participant's functioning and psychopathology with primary emphasis on information relevant to the study of affective disorders and schizophrenia. The organization of the interview and the item coverage are designed to elicit information necessary for making diagnoses based on multiple diagnostic criteria. This section assesses diagnostic criteria for Attention Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder including inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. Skip outs: Questions 1 and 12 are screening questions for inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity (if both Q1 and Q12 are 0 skip to next section); question 1 is a potential skip-point to question 12; question 12 is a potential skip-point to question 23; question 23 is a potential skip-point to the next section. Nurnberger JI Jr., Blehar MC, Kaufmann CA., et al.Diagnostic interview for genetic studies. Rationale, unique features, and training. NIMH Genetics Initiative. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1994;51:849–59. Varies by response. Approximately 1 (administered at baseline with the possibility of additional collections, e.g., in the case of a period of 3+ years without participant contact a DIGS Review may be completed). More Info
*Global Assessment Scale - Baseline (DIGS) global_assessment_scale One section of the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS), a clinician-rated instrument recording information regarding the participant's functioning and psychopathology with primary emphasis on information relevant to the study of affective disorders and schizophrenia. The organization of the interview and the item coverage are designed to elicit information necessary for making diagnoses based on multiple diagnostic criteria. The purpose of this form is to obtain a general, standardized description of the participant's level of functioning during the 30 days prior to interview. *Is this the form that is not completed here, but is instead filled out and entered following the HAMD? Ask clinician/Holli. If so, this section should include a note similar to, 'this information is infrequently entered here, but can be found in another section "Clinician Scales - HAMD" ' Nurnberger JI Jr., Blehar MC, Kaufmann CA., et al.Diagnostic interview for genetic studies. Rationale, unique features, and training. NIMH Genetics Initiative. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1994;51:849–59. 3 Approximately 1 (administered at baseline with the possibility of additional collections, e.g., in the case of a period of 3+ years without participant contact a DIGS Review may be completed). More Info
Interviewers Reliability Assessment - Baseline (DIGS) interviewers_reliability_assessment One section of the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS), a clinician-rated instrument recording information regarding the participant's functioning and psychopathology with primary emphasis on information relevant to the study of affective disorders and schizophrenia. The organization of the interview and the item coverage are designed to elicit information necessary for making diagnoses based on multiple diagnostic criteria. This form asks the interviewer to rate the apparent candor and accuracy of the information obtained in the interview. Questions 2 and 3 require narrative explanation if they are rated as "Fair", question 12 (overall reliability) requires narrative explanation if the interview is rated as unreliable. Nurnberger JI Jr., Blehar MC, Kaufmann CA., et al.Diagnostic interview for genetic studies. Rationale, unique features, and training. NIMH Genetics Initiative. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1994;51:849–59. 12 with possible further narrative explanation where indicated. Approximately 1 (administered at baseline with the possibility of additional collections, e.g., in the case of a period of 3+ years without participant contact a DIGS Review may be completed). More Info
Best Estimate For Diagnosis (BEFD) best_estimates This form represents Principal Investigator and Co-Investigators' best estimate for diagnosis. The best estimate form is completed initially by the clinician completing the DIGS interview (Masters level minimum). The best estimate for diagnosis form is then reviewed and completed again by one Investigator (Doctorate level minimum) before a second Investigator (Doctorate level minimum) determines the final diagnosis. The third and final (most comprehensive, considering all three clinical judgments) best estimate for diagnosis form is entered. Collects the following: Box A: Primary affective disorder diagnosis for each system (DSMIV, DSMIIIR, RDC); includes confidence (Conf; 0-4*) and age at onset (AAO). Box B. Other affective disorders; includes Conf and AAO. Box C. Substance abuse/ dependence; includes Conf, AAO, and age last dependent. Box D. Anxiety and other comorbid conditions; includes Conf and AAO. Features of illness. Includes episode tallies, affective psychosis, independence of psychosis episodes, rapid cycling, functional severity of most severe mania, suicidal thought/behavior, chronicity of substance abuse, chronicity of affective disorder, psychosis chronicity, mixed episodes, functional severity of most severe depression, general impact of illness on life functioning, and drug of choice. Family history. Includes first and second degree with unipolar, bipolar, and other non-mood disorders. *Confidence in diagnosis: 0. No information 1. Diagnosis asserted without supporting information 2. Possible - some criteria met - some supporting information 3. Probable - all criteria met - no supportive information 4. Definite - meets criteria - and has supporting information Nurnberger JI Jr., Blehar MC, Kaufmann CA., et al.Diagnostic interview for genetic studies. Rationale, unique features, and training. NIMH Genetics Initiative. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1994;51:849–59. 5 Approximately 1 (administered at baseline with the possibility of additional collections). If a second Best Estimate is present, there was a change in the participant's diagnosis over the course of their participation. These changes typically occur during the LIFE interviews (even years of annual follow-up). In the case of a change in diagnosis, a new BEFD process would be initiated and the participant's new information would be reviewed again by three clinicians (1 interviewers, 2 investigators). More Info
LIFE Summary summary One section of the Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation (LIFE), a clinician-rated instrument designed to assess the longitudinal course of psychiatric disorders. An interviewer uses the LIFE to collect detailed psychosocial, psychopathologic, and treatment information within the follow-up interval. This section collects the following information within the interval: Significant life events over the interval and additional important comments about the participant/interview, mental status (including appearance/attitude, psychomotor behavior, speech/language, affect, mood, thought process, though content, memory, and insight/judgement), *medication information, medical history within the interval, treatment history within the interval, and individual estimations of percentage of time spent with depressed mood, manic mood, and hypomanic mood within the interval. *Medication history is infrequently entered here because it is preferable that medication history be entered in another location. See Physical Forms for each annual follow-up appointment for this information. Keller MB, Lavori PW, Friedman B., et al.The Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation. A comprehensive method for assessing outcome in prospective longitudinal studies. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1987;44:540–48. LIFE DSM-IV Version developed by Keller MD, Warshaw MG, Dyck I, Dolan RT, Shea MT, Riley K, Shapiro R (1997). LIFE-IV: The Longitudinal Interval Follow Up Evaluation for DSM-IV. Variable administration. Administered 2 years after baseline and then approximately every 2 years (in even years of annual follow-up). In the case of a missed annual assessment where a LIFE appointment was missed, the LIFE may be completed in an odd year of annual follow-up. More Info
Mood Disorder - Follow-Up (LIFE) mood_disorder One section of the Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation (LIFE), a clinician-rated instrument designed to assess the longitudinal course of psychiatric disorders. An interviewer uses the LIFE to collect detailed psychosocial, psychopathologic, and treatment information within the follow-up interval. Collects the following information on mood disorders within the interval: diagnostic criteria for Major Depressive Episode; diagnostic criteria for schizoaffective disorder, depressed; diagnostic criteria for dysthymic disorder; diagnostic criteria for manic episode; diagnostic criteria for schizoaffective disorder, manic; diagnostic criteria for hypomanic episode; diagnostic criteria for cyclothymic disorder. Keller MB, Lavori PW, Friedman B., et al.The Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation. A comprehensive method for assessing outcome in prospective longitudinal studies. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1987;44:540–48. LIFE DSM-IV Version developed by Keller MD, Warshaw MG, Dyck I, Dolan RT, Shea MT, Riley K, Shapiro R (1997). LIFE-IV: The Longitudinal Interval Follow Up Evaluation for DSM-IV. Variable administration. Administered 2 years after baseline and then approximately every 2 years (in even years of annual follow-up). In the case of a missed annual assessment where a LIFE appointment was missed, the LIFE may be completed in an odd year of annual follow-up. More Info
Schizophrenia - Follow-Up (LIFE) schizophrenia One section of the Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation (LIFE), a clinician-rated instrument designed to assess the longitudinal course of psychiatric disorders. An interviewer uses the LIFE to collect detailed psychosocial, psychopathologic, and treatment information within the follow-up interval. Collects the following information to assess schizophrenia within the interval: diagnostic criteria for schizophrenia; diagnostic criteria for psychotic disorder not otherwise specified. Keller MB, Lavori PW, Friedman B., et al.The Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation. A comprehensive method for assessing outcome in prospective longitudinal studies. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1987;44:540–48. LIFE DSM-IV Version developed by Keller MD, Warshaw MG, Dyck I, Dolan RT, Shea MT, Riley K, Shapiro R (1997). LIFE-IV: The Longitudinal Interval Follow Up Evaluation for DSM-IV. Variable administration. Administered 2 years after baseline and then approximately every 2 years (in even years of annual follow-up). In the case of a missed annual assessment where a LIFE appointment was missed, the LIFE may be completed in an odd year of annual follow-up. More Info
Anxiety Disorders - Follow-Up (LIFE) anxiety_disorders One section of the Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation (LIFE), a clinician-rated instrument designed to assess the longitudinal course of psychiatric disorders. An interviewer uses the LIFE to collect detailed psychosocial, psychopathologic, and treatment information within the follow-up interval. Collects the following information to assess anxiety disorders within the interval: diagnostic criteria for panic disorder without agoraphobia; diagnostic criteria for panic disorder with agoraphobia; diagnostic criteria for agoraphobia without history of panic disorder; diagnostic criteria for specific phobia; diagnostic criteria for social phobia; diagnostic criteria for generalized anxiety disorder; diagnostic criteria for obsessive-compulsive disorder; diagnostic criteria for post traumatic stress disorder; diagnostic criteria for anxiety disorder not otherwise specified. Keller MB, Lavori PW, Friedman B., et al.The Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation. A comprehensive method for assessing outcome in prospective longitudinal studies. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1987;44:540–48. LIFE DSM-IV Version developed by Keller MD, Warshaw MG, Dyck I, Dolan RT, Shea MT, Riley K, Shapiro R (1997). LIFE-IV: The Longitudinal Interval Follow Up Evaluation for DSM-IV. Variable administration. Administered 2 years after baseline and then approximately every 2 years (in even years of annual follow-up). In the case of a missed annual assessment where a LIFE appointment was missed, the LIFE may be completed in an odd year of annual follow-up. More Info
Somatization Disorders - Follow-Up (LIFE) somatization_disorders One section of the Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation (LIFE), a clinician-rated instrument designed to assess the longitudinal course of psychiatric disorders. An interviewer uses the LIFE to collect detailed psychosocial, psychopathologic, and treatment information within the follow-up interval. Collects the following information to assess somatization disorders within the interval: diagnostic criteria for somatization disorder; diagnostic criteria for undifferentiated somatoform disorder; diagnostic criteria for pain disorder; diagnostic criteria for hypochondriasis; diagnostic criteria for body dysmorphic disorder. Keller MB, Lavori PW, Friedman B., et al.The Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation. A comprehensive method for assessing outcome in prospective longitudinal studies. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1987;44:540–48. LIFE DSM-IV Version developed by Keller MD, Warshaw MG, Dyck I, Dolan RT, Shea MT, Riley K, Shapiro R (1997). LIFE-IV: The Longitudinal Interval Follow Up Evaluation for DSM-IV. Variable administration. Administered 2 years after baseline and then approximately every 2 years (in even years of annual follow-up). In the case of a missed annual assessment where a LIFE appointment was missed, the LIFE may be completed in an odd year of annual follow-up. More Info
Eating Disorders - Follow-Up (LIFE) eating_disorders One section of the Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation (LIFE), a clinician-rated instrument designed to assess the longitudinal course of psychiatric disorders. An interviewer uses the LIFE to collect detailed psychosocial, psychopathologic, and treatment information within the follow-up interval. Collects the following information to assess eating disorders within the interval: diagnostic criteria for anorexia nervosa; diagnostic criteria for bulimia. Keller MB, Lavori PW, Friedman B., et al.The Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation. A comprehensive method for assessing outcome in prospective longitudinal studies. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1987;44:540–48. LIFE DSM-IV Version developed by Keller MD, Warshaw MG, Dyck I, Dolan RT, Shea MT, Riley K, Shapiro R (1997). LIFE-IV: The Longitudinal Interval Follow Up Evaluation for DSM-IV. Variable administration. Administered 2 years after baseline and then approximately every 2 years (in even years of annual follow-up). In the case of a missed annual assessment where a LIFE appointment was missed, the LIFE may be completed in an odd year of annual follow-up. More Info
Substance Use Disorders - Follow-Up (LIFE) substance_use_disorders One section of the Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation (LIFE), a clinician-rated instrument designed to assess the longitudinal course of psychiatric disorders. An interviewer uses the LIFE to collect detailed psychosocial, psychopathologic, and treatment information within the follow-up interval. Collects the following information to assess substance use disorders within the interval: diagnostic criteria for substance dependence (alcohol dependence, drug dependence), diagnostic criteria for substance abuse (alcohol abuse, drug abuse). Keller MB, Lavori PW, Friedman B., et al.The Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation. A comprehensive method for assessing outcome in prospective longitudinal studies. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1987;44:540–48. LIFE DSM-IV Version developed by Keller MD, Warshaw MG, Dyck I, Dolan RT, Shea MT, Riley K, Shapiro R (1997). LIFE-IV: The Longitudinal Interval Follow Up Evaluation for DSM-IV. Variable administration. Administered 2 years after baseline and then approximately every 2 years (in even years of annual follow-up). In the case of a missed annual assessment where a LIFE appointment was missed, the LIFE may be completed in an odd year of annual follow-up. More Info
Other Psychiatric Disorder - Follow-Up (LIFE) other_psychiatric_disorder One section of the Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation (LIFE), a clinician-rated instrument designed to assess the longitudinal course of psychiatric disorders. An interviewer uses the LIFE to collect detailed psychosocial, psychopathologic, and treatment information within the follow-up interval. This section reviews diagnostic criteria for other psychiatric disorder. Keller MB, Lavori PW, Friedman B., et al.The Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation. A comprehensive method for assessing outcome in prospective longitudinal studies. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1987;44:540–48. LIFE DSM-IV Version developed by Keller MD, Warshaw MG, Dyck I, Dolan RT, Shea MT, Riley K, Shapiro R (1997). LIFE-IV: The Longitudinal Interval Follow Up Evaluation for DSM-IV. Variable administration. Administered 2 years after baseline and then approximately every 2 years (in even years of annual follow-up). In the case of a missed annual assessment where a LIFE appointment was missed, the LIFE may be completed in an odd year of annual follow-up. More Info
*Suicidal Gestures And Attempts - Follow-Up (LIFE) suicidal_gestures_and_attempts One section of the Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation (LIFE), a clinician-rated instrument designed to assess the longitudinal course of psychiatric disorders. An interviewer uses the LIFE to collect detailed psychosocial, psychopathologic, and treatment information within the follow-up interval. Collects the following information to assess suicidal gestures and attempts within the interval: number of suicidal gestures or attempts within the interval; rating of intent, rating of medical threat, circumstances of suicidal behavior, and information on date and cause of death. Question 5 (date of death and cause of death) should not be completed for any participant because the LIFE is completed with the participant. *Holli: is this okay to say? Keller MB, Lavori PW, Friedman B., et al.The Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation. A comprehensive method for assessing outcome in prospective longitudinal studies. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1987;44:540–48. LIFE DSM-IV Version developed by Keller MD, Warshaw MG, Dyck I, Dolan RT, Shea MT, Riley K, Shapiro R (1997). LIFE-IV: The Longitudinal Interval Follow Up Evaluation for DSM-IV. Variable administration. Administered 2 years after baseline and then approximately every 2 years (in even years of annual follow-up). In the case of a missed annual assessment where a LIFE appointment was missed, the LIFE may be completed in an odd year of annual follow-up. More Info
Present Menstrual Status - Follow-Up (LIFE) present_menstrual_status One section of the Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation (LIFE), a clinician-rated instrument designed to assess the longitudinal course of psychiatric disorders. An interviewer uses the LIFE to collect detailed psychosocial, psychopathologic, and treatment information within the follow-up interval. Single item that asks interviewer to characterize the participant's present general menstrual status. Keller MB, Lavori PW, Friedman B., et al.The Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation. A comprehensive method for assessing outcome in prospective longitudinal studies. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1987;44:540–48. LIFE DSM-IV Version developed by Keller MD, Warshaw MG, Dyck I, Dolan RT, Shea MT, Riley K, Shapiro R (1997). LIFE-IV: The Longitudinal Interval Follow Up Evaluation for DSM-IV. 1 Administered 2 years after baseline and then approximately every 2 years (in even years of annual follow-up). In the case of a missed annual assessment where a LIFE appointment was missed, the LIFE may be completed in an odd year of annual follow-up. More Info
Psychosocial Functioning - Follow-Up (LIFE) psychosocial_functioning One section of the Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation (LIFE), a clinician-rated instrument designed to assess the longitudinal course of psychiatric disorders. An interviewer uses the LIFE to collect detailed psychosocial, psychopathologic, and treatment information within the follow-up interval. The purpose of this section is to orient both interviewer and participant to how to participant was doing at the time of the last interview, and to get an overall picture of how well the participant has functioned within the interval. Collects information on the following to assess psychosocial functioning: work, employment, household duties, student work, interpersonal relationships with family, interpersonal relationships with friends, sexual functioning, recreation, overall level of satisfaction. Keller MB, Lavori PW, Friedman B., et al.The Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation. A comprehensive method for assessing outcome in prospective longitudinal studies. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1987;44:540–48. LIFE DSM-IV Version developed by Keller MD, Warshaw MG, Dyck I, Dolan RT, Shea MT, Riley K, Shapiro R (1997). LIFE-IV: The Longitudinal Interval Follow Up Evaluation for DSM-IV. Variable administration. Administered 2 years after baseline and then approximately every 2 years (in even years of annual follow-up). In the case of a missed annual assessment where a LIFE appointment was missed, the LIFE may be completed in an odd year of annual follow-up. More Info
*Global Social Adjustment - Follow-Up (LIFE) global_social_adjustment One section of the Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation (LIFE), a clinician-rated instrument designed to assess the longitudinal course of psychiatric disorders. An interviewer uses the LIFE to collect detailed psychosocial, psychopathologic, and treatment information within the follow-up interval. This section asks the interviewer to rate the participant's usual level of social adjustment within the interval. *This is different in REDCap vs. paper. the paper version organizes by month, but REDCap just asks to rate social adjustment in the last four weeks and social adjustment and social adjustment in the worst week of the worst month of functioning. Holli, how this should be explained in the data dictionary? Keller MB, Lavori PW, Friedman B., et al.The Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation. A comprehensive method for assessing outcome in prospective longitudinal studies. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1987;44:540–48. LIFE DSM-IV Version developed by Keller MD, Warshaw MG, Dyck I, Dolan RT, Shea MT, Riley K, Shapiro R (1997). LIFE-IV: The Longitudinal Interval Follow Up Evaluation for DSM-IV. Variable administration. Administered 2 years after baseline and then approximately every 2 years (in even years of annual follow-up). In the case of a missed annual assessment where a LIFE appointment was missed, the LIFE may be completed in an odd year of annual follow-up. More Info
Feature Of Illness Since The Last Diagnostic Interview - Follow-Up (LIFE) feature_of_illness_since_the_last_diagnostic_inter One section of the Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation (LIFE), a clinician-rated instrument designed to assess the longitudinal course of psychiatric disorders. An interviewer uses the LIFE to collect detailed psychosocial, psychopathologic, and treatment information within the follow-up interval. Collects the following information to assess features of illness within the interval: number of manic episodes; number of depressive episodes; number of hypomanic episodes; number of suicide attempts; number of hospitalizations; presence of psychosis; independence of psychotic episode; presence of rapid cycling; functional severity of most severe mania; suicidal thoughts/ behavior; chronicity of substance abuse; chronicity of affective disorder; psychosis chronicity; presence of mixed episodes; functional severity of most severe depression; general impact of illness on life functioning; drug of choice; first-degree relatives with mood and non-mood disorders; second-degree relatives with mood and non-mood disorders. Keller MB, Lavori PW, Friedman B., et al.The Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation. A comprehensive method for assessing outcome in prospective longitudinal studies. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1987;44:540–48. LIFE DSM-IV Version developed by Keller MD, Warshaw MG, Dyck I, Dolan RT, Shea MT, Riley K, Shapiro R (1997). LIFE-IV: The Longitudinal Interval Follow Up Evaluation for DSM-IV. Variable administration. Administered 2 years after baseline and then approximately every 2 years (in even years of annual follow-up). In the case of a missed annual assessment where a LIFE appointment was missed, the LIFE may be completed in an odd year of annual follow-up. More Info
Neuropsych Demographics demographics ID variables: BP ID / Psychiatry ID (record_id); Participant ID/Neuropsychology ID (subjid) Demographic variables: Date of birth; Calculated age at test; Biological Sex; Gender Identity; Years of education; Marital status; Number of children; Number of people living in household; Employment - Y/N; Employment - type General Comments (continuously effect pt performance, i.e. dyslexia, legally blind) Handedness (for Purdue Peg) Test variables: Date of visit; visit form (A or B); neuropsychology technician initials (who conducted the test); comments for test (only effect test that day, i.e. pt had a migraine); testing validity (npvalidity) Varies by response. Baseline; 1 yr; 5 yr, and 10 yr. 1yr & 5yr testing discontinued in 2017. 4 yr & 6 yr testing introduced in 2020. More Info
Mood Measures mood_measures Structured Interview Guide for the Hamilton Depression Scale (SIGH-D): Measure of depressive symptoms over the past seven days. Hamilton, M. (1960) A rating scale for depression. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, & Psychiatry, 23(1), 56-62; Williams, J.B.W. (1988) A Structured Interview Guide for the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. JAMA Psychiatry, 45(8), 742–747. Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS): Measure of manic symptoms over the past seven days. Young R.C., Biggs J.T., Ziegler V.E., & Meyer, D.A. (1978) A rating scale for mania: reliability, validity, and sensitivity. British Journal of Psychiatry, 133, 429-35. Brief Social Phobia Scale (BSPS): Measure of symptoms of social phobia. *Removed from battery in 2017.* Davidson, J.R., Miner, C.M., De Veaugh-Geiss, J., Tupler, L.A., Colket, J.T., & , N.L. (1997). The Brief Social Phobia Scale: A psychometric evaluation. Psychological Medicine, 27(1), 161-6. SIGH-D: 29; YMRS: 11; BSPS: 14 SIGH-D: Variable; YMRS: Variable; BSPS: 1 yr visit. More Info
Rey Complex Figure Test rey_complex_figure_test Test of visual memory. Packet A: Rey-Osterrieth figure, Osterrieth, P.A. (1944). Le test de copie d’une figure complexe: Contribution à l’étude de la perception et de la mémoire. Archives de psychologie, 30, 285-356; Rey, A. L’examen psychologique dans les cas d’encéphalopathie traumatique. Archives de psychologie, 28, 286-340. Packet B: Rey-Taylor figure, Taylor, L. B. (1969). Localization of cerebral lesions by psychological testing. Clinical Neurosurgery,16, 269-287; Taylor, L. B. (1979). Psychological assessment of neurosurgical patients. In T. Rasmussen & R. Marino (Eds.), Functional neurosurgery. New York: Raven Press. Meyers J, Meyers K. Rey Complex Figure and Recognition Trial: Professional Manual. Odessa, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources; 1995. Recognition trial: Meyers, J.E. & Meyers, K.R. (1995) Rey Complex Figure and Recognition Trial: Professional Manual. Odessa, FL. Psychological Assessment Resources. Varies by response. Baseline; 1 yr; 5 yr, and 10 yr. 1yr & 5yr testing discontinued in 2017. 4 yr & 6 yr testing introduced in 2020. More Info
Purdue Pegboard purdue_pegboard Test of fine motor dexterity. Tiffin, J. & Asher, E.J. (1948) The Purdue Pegboard: norms and studies of reliability and validity. Journal of Applied Psychology, 32(3), 234-247. Varies by response. Baseline; 1 yr; 5 yr, and 10 yr. 1yr & 5yr testing discontinued in 2017. 4 yr & 6 yr testing introduced in 2020. More Info
California Verbal Learning Test california_verbal_learning_test California Verbal Learning Test - Second Edition (CVLT-II): Test of auditory memory. Packet A: CVLT-II Standard version; Delis, D. C., Kramer, J. H., Kaplan, E., & Ober, B. A. (2000). Manual for the California Verbal Learning Test, (CVLT-II). San Antonio, TX: The Psychological Corporation. Packet B CVLT-II Alternate version: Delis, D.C., Massman, P.J., Kaplan, E., Mckee, R., Kramer, J.H., & Gettman, D. (1990) Alternate form of the California verbal learning test: Development and reliability. Clinical Neuropsychologist, 5(2), 154-162. Varies by response. Baseline; 1 yr; 5 yr, and 10 yr. 1yr & 5yr testing discontinued in 2017. 4 yr & 6 yr testing introduced in 2020. More Info
Test Of Memory Malingering test_of_memory_malingering Assesses for participant malingering and validity of results. *Added to battery January, 2011.* Tombaugh, T. N. (1997). The Test of Memory Malingering (TOMM): Normative data from cognitively intact and cognitively impaired individuals. Psychological Assessment, 9(3), 260-268. Trial 1: 50; Trial 2: 50 Variable (Baseline; 1yr; 5yr). More Info
Wisconsin Card Sorting Task wisconsin_card_sorting_task Test of conceptual reasoning and set-shifting. Heaton, R. K. (1981). Wisconsin Card Sorting Test Manual. Odessa, FL. Psychological Assessment Resources. Varies by response. Baseline; 1 yr; 5 yr, and 10 yr. 1yr & 5yr testing discontinued in 2017. 4 yr & 6 yr testing introduced in 2020. More Info
WASI wasi Wechsler Adult Scale of Intelligence: Measure of estimated intelligence (IQ). Wechsler, D. (1999). Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence. New York, NY. The Psychological Corporation: Harcourt Brace & Company. *WASI changed from all four subtests (Block Design, Vocabulary, Matrix Reasoning, Similarities) to only the Vocabulary subtest in June, 2017.* Varies by response. Baseline visit or at one time point (Ex: year 1 if missed at baseline) More Info
Controlled Oral Word Association controlled_oral_word_association Controlled Oral Word Association (COWA): assesses verbal fluency. Packet A: letters C, F, & L; Packet B: letters P, R, & W (phonemic fluency). Benton, A.L., de Hamsher, S.K., & Sivan, A.B. (1994). Multilingual aphasia examination, 3rd ed. Iowa City: AJA Associates. Animal Naming is the second section of COWA (categorical fluency). Tombaugh, T.N., Kozak, J., & Rees, L. (1999) Normative data stratified by age and education for two measures of verbal fluency: FAS and Animal Naming. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 14, 167–177. Varies by response. Baseline; 1 yr; 5 yr, and 10 yr. 1yr & 5yr testing discontinued in 2017. 4 yr & 6 yr testing introduced in 2020. More Info
Trail Making trail_making Test of visuomotor sequencing and cognitive flexibility. Part A: number sequencing; Part B: number and letter sequencing. Packet A: TMT Part A/B; Packet B: TMT Part C/D. Reiten, R.M. (1958) Validity of the Trail Making Test as an indicator of organic brain damage. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 8, 271-276. Varies by response. Baseline; 1 yr; 5 yr, and 10 yr. 1yr & 5yr testing discontinued in 2017. 4 yr & 6 yr testing introduced in 2020. More Info
Emotion Perception Test emotion_perception_test Assesses auditory emotion processing. Green, P.W. & Allen, LM. (1997) The Emotional Perception Test. Durham, NC. CogniSyst Inc. 45. Baseline; 1 yr; 5 yr, and 10 yr. 1yr & 5yr testing discontinued in 2017. 4 yr & 6 yr testing introduced in 2020. More Info
Digit Symbol digit_symbol Digit Symbol Coding (WAIS-III): Test of processing speed. Packet A: D-1; Packet B: D-2. Wechsler, D. (1997) Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III: Administration and scoring manual. San Antonio, TX. The Psychological Association. Varies by response. Baseline; 1 yr; 5 yr, and 10 yr. 1yr & 5yr testing discontinued in 2017. 4 yr & 6 yr testing introduced in 2020. More Info
Stroop stroop Assesses cognitive inhibition. Golden, C., 1978. Stroop Color and Word Test. Stoelting, Chicago, IL. Varies by response. Baseline; 1 yr; 5 yr, and 10 yr. 1yr & 5yr testing discontinued in 2017. 4 yr & 6 yr testing introduced in 2020. More Info
EPT Test ept_test More Info
Metrics metrics Computerized tests. FACIAL EMOTION PERCEPTION TEST (FEPT): Assesses facial emotion processing. Langenecker, S.A., Bieliauskas, L.A., Rapport, L.J., Zubieta, J.K., Wilde, E.A. & Berent, S. (2005) Face emotion perception and executive functioning deficits in depression. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 27(3), 320-333. PARAMETRIC GO/NO-GO TASK (PGNG): Test of sustained attention and inhibitory control. Langenecker SA, Caveney AF, Giordani B et al. The sensitivity and psychometric properties of a brief computer-based cognitive screening battery in a depression clinic. Psychiatry Res 2007; 152: 143–154. SYNONYMS KNOWLEDGE TEST: Assesses verbal knowledge and reasoning. Can also be used as a measure of estimated verbal intelligence. Warrington, K., McKenna, P., & Orpwood E, L. (1998) Single word comprehension: a concrete and abstract word synonym test. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, 8, 143–54. *Removed from test battery in June, 2017.* Varies by response. Baseline; 1 yr; 5 yr, and 10 yr. 1yr & 5yr testing discontinued in 2017. 4 yr & 6 yr testing introduced in 2020. More Info
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